adobo

Adobo

Adobo is used extensively in Puerto Rico to season meats and poultry before cooking. It will keep for several days in the refrigerator, and can be frozen indefinitely. This recipe makes enough to season about 10 pounds of meat.

12 whole black peppercorns
6 cloves garlic, peeled
6 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar or lime juice

Combine all ingredients in an electric blender or food processor and process until well combined. Rub into meat thoroughly and refrigerate for several hours before cooking.

Makes about 1 cup.

adobo

Adobo (Mexican Smoked Chile Marinade)

Source: Food Day, July 9, ’91 From: Valerie Whittle

3 oranges
1 lime
2 to 3 canned chipotle chiles or to taste
3 cloves garlic (1 tablespoon)
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon cumin seed
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon salt

This spicy marinade owes its unusual flavor to the chipotle, a smoked jalapeno chile. Chipotles are usually sold canned in tomato paste. Look for them at Mexican and Latin American markets. Adobo marinade goes particularly well with pork.

Juice the oranges and lime. Finely chop chiles and garlic. Place citrus juices, chilies, garlic, oregano, cumin, black pepper, vinegar and salt in blender and puree until smooth.

Makes enough marinade for 1 1/2 to 2 pounds meat or chicken.

adobo

Adobo

This sauce is basic to many Puerto Rican recipes. It appears on just about everything, either as a marinade or added as a seasoning. Try a little bit when cooking meat.

5 cloves garlic
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup wine vinegar

Peel and mince garlic. Mix garlic, oregano, olive oil and wine vinegar together in a small jar. To use the adobo as a marinade for steak or other meats, allow the meat to marinate in it for 24 hours or so in the refrigerator.

adobo

Adobo

4 large ancho chiles
1/8 teaspoon cumin seeds
1/8 teaspoon Mexican oregano
1/8 teaspoon thyme
1 tablespoon salt
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1/2 cup mild white vinegar

Toast the chiles lightly, turning them from time to time so they do not burn. Slit them open and remove the seeds and veins. Put the chiles into a bowl and cover them with hot water. Let them soak for about 20 minutes, then remove them with a slotted spoon to a blender container. Add remaining ingredients and blend into a fairly smooth paste. Do not over-blend.

To use, coat both sides of meat with Adobo. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Heat oil and fry meat very slowly on both sides, about 20 minutes, depending on the thickness of the meat. When meat has cooked through, raise the heat and brown it quickly. Garnish with sliced scallions.

adobo

Adobo

This sauce is basic to many Puerto Rican recipes. It appears on just about everything, either as a marinade or added as a seasoning. Try a little bit when cooking meat.

5 cloves garlic
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup wine vinegar

Peel and mince garlic. Mix garlic, oregano, olive oil and wine vinegar together in a small jar. To use the adobo as a marinade for steak or other meats, allow the meat to marinate in it for 24 hours or so in the refrigerator.